Engineering

Cybersecurity Seminar: Tony Jeffs, Senior Director of Information Security, Engineering, and Architecture, and Ron Valente, Senior Architect of Information Security, Cisco

Master of Engineering in Cybersecurity students enrolled in CYBERSEC 501 do not need to register for this event.

All other Duke students, staff, and faculty who are interested in attending should contact Elizabeth Leslie (elizabeth.leslie@duke.edu).

Financial Technology Seminar: John Wolpert, Group Executive, Enterprise Mainnet Products and Technology, ConsenSys

ConsenSys is one of the largest and fastest-growing companies in the blockchain technology space, building developer tools, decentralized applications, and solutions that harness the power of Ethereum. Headquartered in New York, ConsenSys invests in and employs top entrepreneurs, computer scientists, software developers, and experts in enterprise solution development and new venture creation worldwide.

Master of Engineering in Financial Technology (FinTech) students enrolled in FinTech 501 do not need to register for this event.

Cybersecurity Seminar: Tom O’Malley: Founder, Frozen Pii, LLC and former Assistant United States Attorney (Federal Cybercrime Prosecutor) for the US Department of Justice

Master of Engineering in Cybersecurity students enrolled in CYBERSEC-501 do not need to register for this event.

All other Duke students, staff, and faculty who are interested in attending should contact Elizabeth Leslie (elizabeth.leslie@duke.edu).

Software and the honeycomb code

Recently, Hastings & Haah published a preprint (arXiv:2107.02194) describing a quantum code where the logical observables must dance around. The counter-intuitive nature of the code's observables, and historical precedent, would suggest that estimating the circuit-noise threshold of such a code would take months of work. Instead, using the open source tools Stim and PyMatching, initial prototype estimates were done over a weekend. This talk will discuss how these tools were used, where they struggled, and why they were able to cope with an unforeseen quantum code.

Quantum computing with rotation-symmetric bosonic codes

Bosonic mode error-correcting codes are error-correcting codes where a qubit (or qudit) is encoded into one or multiple bosonic modes, i.e., quantum oscillators with an infinite Hilbert space. In the first part of this talk I will give an introduction to codes that have a phase space translation symmetry, i.e. the Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill aka GKP, and codes that have a rotation symmetry. Moreover, I will survey the impressive experimental progress on these codes.

Virtual Fall Career Fair

Join us on Thursday, September 23 from 11:00am - 3:00pm EST to connect with employers across all industries. The fair provides a great opportunity for employers and students to meet and discuss the organization, interests, and any available or upcoming full-time jobs/internships.

Please continue to check Handshake for an updated list of employer attendees and their corresponding schedules for 1-on-1 and/or group sessions.

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