Diversity/Inclusion

Women Thriving in STEM

Join the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University, the Triangle Women in STEM, and the Duke Women's Center at 6:00 pm ET, Tuesday, March 22 as we celebrate how women have thrived and made strides in the fields of STEM! This event will feature a panel of local women leaders, who will discuss how they became interested in STEM and thrived in their fields.

Women Thriving in STEM

Join the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University, the Triangle Women in STEM, and the Duke Women's Center on March 22nd at 6 p.m. as we celebrate how women have thrived and made strides in the fields of STEM! This event will feature a panel of local women leaders, who will discuss how they became interested in STEM and thrived in their fields.

Understanding Racism and Bias in Computing

This fourth lecture in the Identity & Computing Lecture Series, Understanding Racism and Bias in Computing welcomes Dr. Ebony McGee, who investigates what it means to be racially marginalized while minoritized in the context of learning and achieving in STEM higher education and in the STEM professions.

Speaker Dr. Ebony McGee is an associate professor of diversity and STEM education at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College.

AiiCE: A Large-Scale Effort to Cultivate Inclusive Excellence in Computing

As society continues to charge through a computational revolution, it is imperative that a diverse range of disciplines and groups shape and influence the future of computing and its applications. To date, however, much of computing design, development, and implementation has been dominated by technocentric fields which lack diversity with respect to identity.

Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code

This third lecture in the Identity & Computing Lecture Series: Understanding Racism and Bias in Computing welcomes Dr. Ruha Benjamin, who will examine the relationship between machine bias and systemic racism, analyzing specific cases of "discriminatory design" and offering tools for a socially-conscious approach to tech development.

Speaker Dr. Ruha Benjamin is a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University and author of People's Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (Stanford University Press).

Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to racist practices of a previous era. In this talk, Ruha presents the concept of the "New Jim Code" to explore a range of discriminatory designs that encode inequity: by explicitly amplifying racial hierarchies, by ignoring but thereby replicating social divisions, or by aiming to fix racial bias but ultimately doing quite the opposite.

RESPONSE-ABILITY: Anthropology and Activism, A conversation with Cultural Anthropology faculty and graduate students on political commit/meants

Cultural Anthropology presents

RESPONSE-ABILITY: Anthropology and Activism
A conversation with Cultural Anthropology faculty and graduate students on political commit/meants

Featuring Cultural Anthropology professors Christine Folch, Anne-Maria Makhulu, and Ralph Litzinger, and graduate students Naledi Yaziyo, Joe Hiller, and Hannah Borenstein

Monday, November 8, 2021
1:30pm

Hybrid

In person
Friedl Building, Room 225

And

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